Dog Ear Wax: Does Your Dog Have Excessive Ear Discharge? | TheGoodyPet
Dog Ear Wax: Does Your Dog Have Excessive Ear Discharge?

Dog Ear Wax: Does Your Dog Have Excessive Ear Discharge?

PETE DECKER / OCTOBER 14, 2019 / DOGS

Similar to humans, dog ears tend to produce ear wax, and this is perfectly natural. But, if you notice that the amount of wax in your dog’s ears is a bit too much, there might be a problem there. It could be a sign of an ear infection or a parasite. In scientific circles, ear wax is referred to as cerumen, and it typically emanates from the ear canal for protection purposes.

However, if there’s too much wax coming out of your dog’s ears, then this could attract all kinds of severe health issues, including painful ears, ear mite infestations, fungal infections, and bacterial infections. The pain can be unbearable when the wax is buried deep in the ear canal.

That’s why it’s essential to make sure your dog’s ears don’t accumulate too much wax as it could lead to some of the health issues mentioned above.

1

What Causes Excess Earwax in Dogs?

Excess ear wax in dogs can be caused by several different factors. However, allergies are the most common reason, which is probably why allergy-prone dogs tend to scratch their ears a lot.

If left untreated, excess earwax can cause your dog to develop inflammation.

2

Ear Infections

Ear infections are typically the main cause of ear discharge and excess wax in dogs. That’s because your dog’s system produces the earwax to protect the affected area from further inflammation. A dog that has a habit of constantly scratching its ears will be more susceptible to inflammation and ear discharge as well.

However, you can train your dog to stop scratching its ears excessively by rewarding it with treats whenever your pooch sits still or using the “cone of shame” method.

It may take a long while to wean your dog away from scratching its ears using these methods, but they do offer a permanent solution.

3

Ear Mites

It’s not uncommon for dogs to get ear mites, and this is a highly contagious condition that easily spreads between animals when they’re in close proximity. This means that if one of your pets get ear mites, the rest will probably follow.

Ear mites can cause excessive ear wax that has a reddish-brown appearance as well as inflammation. A great way of keeping ear mites at bay is to have regular cleaning of your dog’ ears or flush them out at least once a month.

Speak with your local veterinarian to ask for a recommendation on the best dog ear cleaner to use to get rid of debris, wax and ear mites.

4

Allergies

If you suspect your dog has allergies, always consult with your vet first. That way, you can figure out what type of allergen he has so you can reduce or eliminate exposure to the aggravating material or substance.

Your vet will be able to prescribe suitable medication for the specific allergy that your dog suffers from. Allergy treatment is usually the only available treatment for excessive ear discharge in some dogs.

But, you need to be disciplined as a pet owner so you can make sure that you administer the medicine in the right doses and at the right time.

5

Why Use A Dog Ear Cleaner?

As a pet owner, you don’t want to see your dog go through any type of pain or discomfort. Unfortunately, that’s what happens when pets develop excessive ear discharge and infections. The best way to keep this from happening to flush or clean your dog’s ears regularly using a vet-approved ear cleaner.

This is a great way to prevent the build-up of wax and inflammation while keeping ear mites at bay.