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Shiba Inu Husky Mix – Your Complete Breed Guide To The Shiba Inusky

One of the recent hybrid dogs rising in popularity in the past 20 years is the Shiba Inu Husky Mix or as they are sometimes called Shiba Inusky or Shiba Husky. 

Shiba Inu Husky Mix is a combination of the fox-like Japanese Shiba Inu and wolf-like Siberian Husky – a good mixture of the somewhat aloof and reserved personality of the former and the gregarious personality of the latter. The Shiba Inu Husky dog can be a great family dog and a pleasant buddy to live with, for as long as you know what to expect, how to conduct a good training program and teach children to behave around a Shiba Inusky and respect its boundaries.

Get to know more about the Shiba Inusky like its temperament, the proper care so it would reach its maximum lifespan, and more. For now, let’s talk more about the size and the other physical characteristics of a Shiba Inu Husky MIx.

How Big Do Shiba Inu Husky Mixes Get?

The Shiba Husky Mixes are medium-sized dogs that have an average height of 13 to 18 inches and an average weight of 15 to 30 lbs. Most of the Shiba Inu Husky Mixes have reached their adult sizes upon maturing at 12 months.

Physical Characteristics

The Shiba Inu and the Siberian Husky are 2 different dog breeds and neither are they cousins. But, both the Siberian Husky and the Shiba Inu have striking physical attributes, thus the result of breeding these 2 purebred dogs is a striking dog with eye-catching colors.

The Shiba Inusky hybrid dogs have almond-shaped eyes, which may be blue, brown, or amber, and sometimes the eyes come in 2 tones referred to as heterochromia. This does not affect their vision though. They have erect, small, and triangular ears and long muzzles with black or brown noses.

Moreover, the Shiba Husky hybrid dogs are smaller than their Husky parents but muscular and well-proportioned. They have plush, dense, double-coated furs and the mixing of breeds creates colors and patterns ranging from red to black and tan to white.

What Is The Right Environment For Shiba Inu Husky Mixes?

Shiba Huskies need adequate space to play around. Small apartments and condos could be possible but a nearby area like a park where they could move around is ideal. A cool climate of 50 to 75 ºF is best for this breed. Too much warmth could cause dehydration and pose problems with the skin due to their thick coats.

It goes without saying that Shiba Inu Huskies thrive well in frigid temperatures because that is the natural habitat of their parents.

How Long Do Shiba Inu Husky Mixes Live?

Shiba Inu Huskies are a fairly sound and healthy breed and can live for as long as 15 years. But, like other dogs, they can acquire some of the common health issues of their parents. This is why it is important to be an observant dog owner so you can determine if there are changes in the way they move as well as in their overall behavior.

In addition, of course, regular vet check-ups are highly recommended.

Hip And Joint Dysplasia

This orthopedic health issue happens when there is an abnormal placement in the ball and socket of the hip joints causing your fur baby to lose interest in its daily activities. Other common signs include decreased muscle mass in the thighs, and difficulties in both walking and running.

Patellar Luxation 

This is a condition wherein the kneecap is dislocated and can cause the extension of the knee joint. Depending on the severity, this health problem can cause long-term problems.

Progresive Retinal Atrophy 

An eye disease characterized by the slow retinal deterioration. As the problem progresses, the condition affects the daytime vision.

Tail Chasing Or Spinning

A compulsive behavior that comes with loss of appetite and decreased water intake. In most cases, the problem begins at 6 months of age. The dog shows intense preoccupation with its tail to the point that it will continuously chase its tail for hours.

Some experts say that tail chasing or spinning is a form of seizure that can be treated with phenobarbital and in conjunction with other types of medicines.

How To Take Care Of Shiba Inuskies?

Exercise

The Shiba Inuskies came from 2 vigorous and active dog breeds so they would need to be taken for long walks for at least an hour each day. Smelling new scents and discovering new environments keep Shiba Huskies physically and mentally stimulated.

Lots of playtime like tug-of-war with their human families are also needed to increase bonding time and make them feel loved and secured. Otherwise, all those pent-up energies would be channeled to your furniture around the house or aggressiveness towards other pets and people as a result of lack of physical activities. 

Diet

Shiba Inuskies are very active and muscular dogs so they would need lots of proteins in their diet. Depending on their weight, Shiba Huskies could be fed 1 to 1½ cups of high quality food with good amounts of protein content such as Pet Plate. 

Pet Plate is made with human-grade ingredients so you are guaranteed of its freshness. In addition, it is highly digestible which is recommended for dogs that have Arctic ancestry like the Shiba Inu Husky Mix hybrid dogs.

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Multivitamins 

Giving them supplements would also ensure a long and healthy life for Shiba Huskies canine pals. Choose multivitamins that contain glucosamine for healthy joints and lessen the pain associated with arthritis.

Moreover, Omega 3 or fish supplement plays a huge role in maintaining healthy skin and coat of Shiba Inuskies.

Not to be taken for granted is the oral health. By investing in dental water additives, tartar prevention and other dental problems are prevented. Simply add 1 teaspoon of additives per water serving and you are all set for the day.

Having a hard time calming your dog down for a tooth brushing session? Find out more about using dental water additives as the alternative, how it works, and of course how to choose the best in our article here!
Learn more >

Are Shiba Inu Husky Mixes Dangerous? Temperaments Of Shiba Inu Husky Mixes

As a dominant and assertive breed, the Shiba Inu Husky Mixes are not for everyone, especially new pet owners. The Shiba Inusky Mixes are not always obedient and can be pretty stubborn.

If they fail to receive training and socialization from a young age, Shiba Inu Husky Mixes can become aggressive and pose a danger to kids and other pets.

Understanding The Shiba Inu Husky Temperament

The strong personalities of both parents are definitely passed on to the young ones. The Shiba Inus are known as being quiet and standoffish while the Huskies have clingy and attention-grabbing personalities. Either way, the resulting pups could be a nice mixture of fun, confidence, as well as assertive nature.

The Shiba Inu Husky Mixes shouldn’t be taken care of by someone who is meek. It’s because the Shiba Inuskies can easily sway an owner to spoil them, thus, these dogs respond better to disciplined and assertive owners.

While Shiba Inu Husky Mixes love their human families, it’s more likely that they will show their love through loyalty rather than through affection. They tolerate cuddling and petting but will walk away when they have enough. All in all, the Shiba Inu Husky Mixes are good guard dogs, dominant in some ways but very loving and protective of their human family.

Separation Anxiety

The Shiba Inu Huskies are active dogs that enjoy moving around and entertaining their family with antics. However, coming from one parent known for being aloof, do not be surprised if the Shiba Inu Huskies would prefer to be alone and away from their human families for some period of ‘me-time’.

Do Shiba Inu Husky Mixes Shed? Grooming Tips For Shiba Inu Husky Mixes

Shiba Inu Husky Mixes have a fluffy, dense undercoat, and a softer outer coat so they need a lot of brushing because they shed a lot. Hence, the Shiba Husky Mixes are not hypoallergenic dogs.

Grooming Tips

Since Shiba Inu Husky Mixes canine pals shed a lot, especially during spring and fall, you have to brush the coat adequately and regularly. If not, fur could accumulate in every corner and furniture around the house and even on your clothes and beddings.

To remove loose undercoat hair, choose a tool that promises to deliver good results like the Furminator Undercoat Tool. If used regularly, the Furminator Undercoat Tool dramatically reduces shedding to as much as 90%. What’s else to love about this useful product?

  • The curved edge allows it to conform to the muscular build of a Shiba Inu Husky Mix.
  • The stainless edge reaches the undercoat without damaging the softer outer coat.
  • The ergonomic shape makes brushing a comfortable task for you.

Other routines for grooming include ear cleaning, nail clipping, and paw pad maintenance.

Furminator Undercoat Tool

How Often Do You Bathe?

The Shiba Inu Husky Mix is a very clean dog that cleanses its dense coat very often through licking. You don’t have to give it a bath often, once a month is enough to prevent skin drying.

What we recommend is to use a dog shampoo that is gently formulated to clean and at the same time moisturizes the coat like the Mighty Petz-2-in-1 Oatmeal Dog Shampoo And Conditioner. This shampoo is made with nothing but natural and organic ingredients like aloe vera and baking soda.

Mighty Petz-2-in-1 Oatmeal Dog Shampoo And Conditioner

Related Questions

How Much Does A Shiba Inu Husky Mix Cost? A Shiba Inu Husky Mix can cost from $500 to as high as $2,000. Prices differ depending on a breeder’s reputation and experience. A proper breeder would give adequate information about the parentage of the puppies and also provide initial vaccinations. Another option is adoption via your local rescue shelters which would cost lower.

Do Huskies And Shiba Inus Get Along? No, it’s because of the domineering nature of these 2 dogs. Plus, both Huskies and Shiba Inus are territorial, thus, both dogs would try to dominate each other resulting in a conflict. Given those qualities, it is better for an aloof Shiba Inu not to have a dog companion, especially if it’s a playful Husky.

Is A Shiba Inu Husky Mix A Hunting Dog? Yes, it’s because its Shiba Inu parent is well-regarded in Japan and known for its excellence in hunting birds and wild boars. On the other hand, this pooch has the working gene derived from a Husky, the other parent. That said, the Shiba Inu Husky Mix is an energetic hybrid dog that is also good at hunting.

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